Free Writing Courses

Ready to learn freelance writing? We are here to help. Find free writing courses, helpful tools, and answers to frequently asked questions about content writing as a freelancer. 

*This page includes affiliate links from brands we trust. 

1

Copyblogger

Free

Available now

1

Copyblogger

Copywriting 101: A Course to Craft Compelling Copy


A helpful course digging into how to craft copy that compels readers to take action. 

Free

Available now

2

SEMRush

Free

Available now

2

SEMRush

Free Courses


SEMRush offers a variety of courses for free and currently has two free content marketing courses. 

We recommend: 

Content Marketi...

Free

Available now

3

QuickSprout

Free

Available now

3

QuickSprout

Free Guide


QuickSprout is a trusted authority in the copywriting space and this guide covers a great deal of helpful info for new copywriters...

Free

Available now

More Coming Soon...

More Coming Soon...

Content Writing Tools

1. Grammarly

Grammarly helps you minimize errors in your writing, while also helping to make it more effective. You can sign up for a free plan or a premium plan. Even the free plan is pretty darn good. A great tool for any freelancer who wants to learn freelance writing, as well as experienced writers. 

2. Copyscape

Copyscape scans your work to ensure it's original (not plagiarized). This is extremely important to clients. It's super affordable!

3. Hemingway Editor

The FREE Hemingway App is awesome. It helps make your writing bold and clear.  Plus, it tells you the readability grade level of your content so you can match it to your audience. 

Freelance Writing FAQ

Frequently asked questions about freelance writing work

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What type of writing should I be doing for clients if I want steady freelance writing work?

It depends. Businesses need:


  • Brand development
  • Brand books
  • Company handbooks
  • Website content
  • Social media posts
  • Social media profile content
  • Ad copy
  • Product descriptions
  • Email campaigns
  • Whitepapers
  • Case studies
  • Blogs
  • And more...


Just to name a few content types ;). 


Start with blogging

I'd say the easiest place to start is blogs. Blogs are typically informative content pieces that don't require more advanced sales copy techniques. You may be asked to incorporate keywords and headings, use a particular voice, and write to a specific persona but usually, the requirements will be laid out very clearly. It's really just about explaining topics in a clear and easy-to-read way. Plus, businesses need them on an ongoing basis (hello, recurring income). 


Continue with informative content

Any other type of informative content is great for beginners to intermediate level writers.  


Advance to sales copy

Then, comes sales copy. Sales copy often takes more time and requires more skill but warrants higher pay because it drives revenue. If you're experienced, you can venture into landing pages, branding strategy, ad copy, and website copy to up your earnings 


How do I narrow down my freelance writing niche?

The further refine your target audience, the more personal messaging you can create. For me, it took some time and trial-and-error to figure out what type of writing I wanted to focus on. And it may be the same for you. 


However, if you already know, you can focus on the above audiences that specialize in your chosen niche. For example, if you are passionate about health and wellness, you would look for digital agencies, small businesses, large blogs, writers, and entrepreneurs who also target that space. 


If you are specifically interested in yoga, you could further specialize in that area and look for clients with writing needs on that topic. As a specialist, you can also charge a higher rate. If you aren't sure yet, don't worry. Start experimenting in different niches to find which ones resonate with you. You may also want to consider which freelance writing niches pay the best. 


How do freelance writers get steady clients?

There are many approaches to finding clients. It's typically best to use a multi-channel approach. Here are some of the industry best practices:


  • Create a simple website to represent your writing services. Bluehost makes it cheap to start and enables you to easily build a WordPress site. 
  • Share examples of your work on your website. 
  • Create a profile on LinkedIn and optimize it to sell your writing services. 
  • Network with your target audience(s). 
  • Make lists of potential clients with their contact information and begin cold emailing or calling to pitch your services. 


Learn more about who to target if you want steady ongoing freelance work. 


How should I pitch my freelance writing services to a client?

You should have a unique message for each type of client you are pitching. Take some time to personalize the pitch to their needs. Research them and think about how you can help to make their life easier and remove pain points they might be experiencing. 


For example, an agency owner may have an overflow of clients but not enough quality writers to keep up with the work. A problem that costs them money. If you come in and explain that you understand their problem AND you can ensure they have a qualified writer on call to take advantage of more client opportunities, they will likely be interested. 


In short, address the target's pain points and show how your services can solve them. Guide them to respond to you to learn more and get a free consultation. But don't include your pricing right off the bat. Leave them a bit curious. You want to guide them toward a conversation, not a quick no. We will cover this in more depth in an upcoming blog. 


How much should I charge a client as a freelance writer?

The big question! What should you charge? No, not one million dollars lol. It largely depends on your skill level, the type of work you are doing, the scope of the project, your experience, and possibly where you are based. 


I've written 1,000-word blogs for $25 and for $1,000 throughout the last seven years. Both, not the norm. You'll find a balance, as copywriter Kaleena Stroud, explains in our recent podcast, where you share your pricing and potential clients aren't shutting you down right away but aren't taking advantage of you either. And that rate can increase over time as your skills and reputation develop. The minimum wage standard


  • I've spoken with other writers who advise looking at the minimum wage in your area and ensuring your compensation is at least equal to it. I definitely agree that the minimum wage is a bare minimum you shouldn't go under. But writers are skilled professionals who can offer valuable assets to clients which are worth well above minimum wage. 


My observations

  • In my experience, beginner content writers of blogs and articles (not copywriters) who are fluent in English can make around $50 to $75 per 1,000 words. While established, advanced writers are making anywhere from $200 to $450 and sometimes more per 1,000 words. Intermediate writers seem to fall in the middle as they progress. 


Other official sources


Pricing is a topic of much debate and there are many variables so I don't recommend you treat any singular source like a hard and fast standard. But by looking at multiple sources and testing out your rates on the market, you can find your sweet spot. 


Get a FREE tool to help you set and optimize your freelance writing rates.